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#1 May 7, 2016 06:00:33

GumbyGroove
Registered: 2016-05-03
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Private Jam

I just tried a private jam with a friend and we could not get synced. It was like there was a delay from one to the other and we were always hearing each other in a different part of the song? Any suggestions?

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#2 May 7, 2016 16:02:54

adi
Registered: 2014-09-08
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Private Jam

GumbyGroove
It was like there was a delay from one to the other and we were always hearing each other in a different part of the song?
jammr works with a default precisely controlled delay: one interval!!! choose the bpi and bpm to fit best for your song and play all chord progression inside this interval. start with bit 1 and your interval will be send to your band member next interval. loops are more efficient in this case than following the other play. and use metronome bar (down right in the main window) for perfect synchrony. i think it is not suitable for two lead vocalists…



I like ukulele, recorder, guitar, drum, piano (absolute beginner)

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#3 May 8, 2016 07:46:12

stefanha
Registered: 2012-11-11
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Private Jam

From the FAQ:

“How does jammr work?

jammr sends your audio to other users and receives their audio. In order to avoid lag, jammr is ”live“ but not ”real-time“. This means other players hear you after a fixed amount of time. This fixed amount is called the interval and can be set to fit the chord progression you are jamming to. This allows you to jam synchronised with people from all over the world.

Why is jammr not real time?

At the speed of light it takes 67 milliseconds to go half-way across the world. This means jamming with someone halfway across the world would be noticably laggy. Therefore, to ensure that you can jam with people from all over the world without delay we use intervals.”

For example, if your chord progression is Am F G G and the time signature is 4/4, you would set the interval to 4 bars * 4 beats = 16 BPI. This way the notes you play will fit onto the chords that the other person is playing.

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#4 May 9, 2016 16:18:36

GumbyGroove
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Private Jam

Thank you for the responses. We were attempting to play a 32 bar jazz standard in 4/4 time. How do you know which BPI is appropriate for that?

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#5 May 9, 2016 17:08:54

adi
Registered: 2014-09-08
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Private Jam

GumbyGroove
We were attempting to play a 32 bar jazz standard in 4/4 time. How do you know which BPI is appropriate for that?
You have to change bpi according to your wish. If you choose a public jam at start you must press “vote” button from top menu and a drop down list appear. Press bpi and double the bpi in the window (so write there 32). The same must be done by the rest of the band members until the bpi is set to 32.

Of course this means two regular 4/4 rock bars. If jazz is different you have to count similarly.

Trick: ask your drummer to make a clear drumming sequence with marks for the first and the last bits instead of metronome. In this way you will know when the chord progression starts in a long interval…



I like ukulele, recorder, guitar, drum, piano (absolute beginner)

Edited adi (May 10, 2016 07:54:24)

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#6 May 10, 2016 06:56:48

stefanha
Registered: 2012-11-11
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Private Jam

32 bars * 4 beats/bar = 128 BPI

That is very long. The longer the interval, the harder it is to get back into the progression when someone makes a mistake.

I suggest starting with just 8 bars of the progression and not playing the rest until you are comfortable. The setting you need is 8 bars * 4 beats/bar = 32 BPI. With some pratice you'll be able to extend the interval and play the full progression.

It helps a lot to have a drum loop playing so people have a sense of the beat. In a long progression the plain metronome doesn't give much of a clue as to where you are.

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#7 May 10, 2016 17:44:11

GumbyGroove
Registered: 2016-05-03
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Private Jam

Thanks, I will definitely try those suggestions!

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